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questions [2021/04/28 21:43]
jthaler [What is yet another good practice problem for the MIT Nuclear/Particle Theory oral qualifying exam?]
questions [2021/10/07 02:32] (current)
jthaler [What are your pronouns?]
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 He/him/his. He/him/his.
  
-I have debated many times with myself about whether I should put this information in my email signature.  "​Jesse"​ is a somewhat gender ambiguous name, and I don't mind (too much) when people ​add an extra "​i"​ by mistake. ​ It feels a bit uncomfortable to assert my gender at this point in my career when the gender ambiguity in my name (and in my past [[http://​v1.jthaler.net/​photos/​images/​2002.05.C/​dance_rig.jpg|hairstyle]]) was part of my experience growing up.  Alsophysics is a rather male-dominated field, and I worry that providing my pronouns would somehow reinforce male-ness as the default ​for a physics professor, though ​also appreciate that my reticence is probably doing so implicitly.+I have debated many times with myself about whether I should put this information in my email signature, and I finally decided to add this information ​in October 2021, for reasons ​explain below.
  
-In any case, I do like the way that providing pronouns signals an aspiration towards a more diverse and inclusive physics environment. ​ As I often tell my students: there are as many ways to be a successful physicist as there are successful physicists. ​ So while I don'​t ​currently ​give my preferred pronouns, my email signature does have a link to the [[https://​physics.mit.edu/​about-physics/​community-values/​|MIT Physics Community Values]].  ​+Firstlet me explain my long hesitation. ​ "​Jesse"​ is a somewhat gender ambiguous name, and I don't mind (too much) when people add an extra "​i"​ by mistake. ​ It felt a bit uncomfortable to assert my gender at this point in my career when the gender ambiguity in my name (and in my past [[http://​v1.jthaler.net/​photos/​images/​2002.05.C/​dance_rig.jpg|hairstyle]]) was part of my experience growing up.  Also, physics is a rather male-dominated field, and I worried that providing my pronouns would somehow reinforce male-ness as the default for a physics professor, though I also appreciated that my reticence was probably doing so implicitly.  ​I do like the way that providing pronouns signals an aspiration towards a more diverse and inclusive physics environment. ​ As I often tell my students: there are as many ways to be a successful physicist as there are successful physicists. ​ So while I didn't give my preferred pronouns, my email signature ​did (and still doeshave a link to the [[https://​physics.mit.edu/​about-physics/​community-values/​|MIT Physics Community Values]]. 
 + 
 +What made me change my mind to include my pronouns? ​ I received an email from a student who put not only their pronouns but also the pronunciation of their name in their email signature. ​ In the same way that misgendering a person is disrespectful,​ mispronouncing their name is as well.  Providing this information seemed like a positive (albeit small) step towards making the physics community more welcome. ​ So while I didn't go so far as to create an [[https://​diversity.lbl.gov/​2020/​09/​15/​how-do-you-pronounce-your-name-add-an-audio-pronunciation-link-to-your-email/​|audio version of my name]], I now state both my pronouns (he/​him/​his) and my pronunciation (JEH-see THAY-lr) in my signature. ​
  
  
questions.1619646219.txt.gz · Last modified: 2021/04/28 21:43 by jthaler